About the Exhibit

Six million Jews and millions of others, including Gypsies, Slavs, political dissenters, homosexuals, P.O.W.’s and the mentally ill and infirm were murdered by the Nazis between 1933 and 1945. The Nazi policy of racial hatred moved with relentless cruelty from hateful propaganda to mass murder, culminating in the extermination of European Jewry and culture.
 
The magnitude of brutality, the remorseless cruelty, and the cold industrial character of mass murder during the Holocaust are unique. However, the root causes of the Holocaust persist.
 
Racial hatred, economic crises, human psychological and moral flaws, the complacency or complicity of ordinary individuals in the persecution of their neighbors are still ominously common.

Thus we must have the courage to remember and study the Holocaust, no matter how disturbing these studies and memories may be. For only informed, understanding, and morally committed individuals can prevent such persecution from happening againstThe persecution of people is always and everywhere intolerable and to act against it is a beginning for hope.

“The Courage to Remember” is both a tribute and a warning; a tribute to the six million Jews and millions of others, including Gypsies, Slavs, political dissenters, homosexuals, and prisoners of war, who were murdered by the Nazis between 1933 and 1945; and a warning that the root causes of the Holocaust persist.

 

 

 

The Foundation for California sponsors the Courage to Remember traveling exhibit which has been opened in more than 40 countries around the world and seen by more than 10 million people to date.

The Foundation sponsors on-going exhibitions across the United States and has a proactive effort to make contact in communities where hatred is still alive.

For more information about the Courage to Remember visit www.CourageToRemember.com.

Please take a moment to look at some of the media covering the Courage to Remember traveling exhibit.  Please like us and share the exhibit on social media.

 

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